Home » A Short Meditation on the Moral Glory of the Lord Jesus Christ, by J.G.B. by John Gifford Bellett
A Short Meditation on the Moral Glory of the Lord Jesus Christ, J.G.B. by John Gifford Bellett

A Short Meditation on the Moral Glory of the Lord Jesus Christ,

J.G.B. by John Gifford Bellett

Published
ISBN : 9780217310642
Paperback
42 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1865. Excerpt: ... sustained in the midst of them then, heMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1865. Excerpt: ... sustained in the midst of them then, he sustains now. The Lord was continually giving, but he was rarely assenting. He made great communications where he found but little communion. This magnifies or illustrates his goodness. There was, as it were, nothing to draw him forth, and yet he was ever imparting. He was as the Father in heaven, of whom he himself spoke, making his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sending his rain on the just and on the unjust. This tells us what he is, to his praise--what we are, to our shame. But he was not only thus, as the Father in heaven, the reflection of such a one in his doings, but he was also in this world as the unknown God, as St. Paul speaks. The darkness did not comprehend him- the world, neither by its religion nor its wisdom, knew him. The rich aboundings of his grace, the purity of his kingdom, the foundation and title upon which the glory he sought in such a world as this alone could rest, were all strangers to the thoughts of the children of men. All this is seen in the deep moral mistakes they were continually making. When, for instance, the multitude were exultingly hailing the King and the kingdom in his person, in Luke xix., Master, rebuke thy disciples, the Pharisees say. They would not brook the thought of the throne belonging to such a one. It was presumption in him, Jesus of Nazareth as he was, to allow the royal joy to surround him. They knew not--they had not learnt--the secret of true honour in this false, fallen world of ours. They had not learnt the mystery of a root out of a dry ground, nor had they in spirit perceived the arm of the Lord. (Isa. liii.) It was where his own Spirit led, that discoveries were made of him, and such are very sweet, --various, too, in their measures. ...