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Writers Guild of America: 2007-2008 Writers Guild of America Strike, Effect of the 2007-08 Writers Guild of America Strike on Television Source Wikipedia

Writers Guild of America: 2007-2008 Writers Guild of America Strike, Effect of the 2007-08 Writers Guild of America Strike on Television

Source Wikipedia

Published August 16th 2011
ISBN : 9781157419471
Paperback
26 pages
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 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 25. Chapters: 2007-2008 Writers Guild of America strike, Effect of the 2007-08 Writers Guild of America strike onMorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 25. Chapters: 2007-2008 Writers Guild of America strike, Effect of the 2007-08 Writers Guild of America strike on television, WGA screenwriting credit system, Canada on Strike, Writers Guild of America, West, Patric Verrone, Fans4Writers, 1988 Writers Guild of America strike, Writers Guild of America, East, Richard Baer, Strike.TV, Writers Guild of America Awards 2001, Del Reisman, 1960 Writers Guild of America strike, John Furia, Jr., Writers Guild of America Awards 2002, WGA script registration service. Excerpt: The 2007-2008 Writers Guild of America strike, more commonly referred to as simply the Writers Strike, was a strike by the Writers Guild of America, East (WGAE) and the Writers Guild of America, West (WGAW). The WGAE and WGAW labor unions represent film, television, and radio writers working in the United States. More than 12,000 writers joined the strike which started on November 5, 2007 and concluded on February 12, 2008. The strikes goal was to rectify what was perceived as a historical injustice to America: the greatly diminished monetary compensation the writers earned in comparison with the profits of the larger studios. It was targeted at the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers (AMPTP), a trade organization representing the interests of 397 American film and television producers. The most influential of these are eleven corporations: CBS (headed by Les Moonves), MGM (Harry E. Sloan), NBC Universal (Jeffrey Zucker), The Weinstein Company (Harvey and Bob Weinstein), Lionsgate (Jon Feltheimer), News Corp/Fox (Peter Chernin), Paramount Pictures (Brad Grey), Anchor Bay/Liberty Media/Starz (Chris McGurk), Sony Pictures (Michael Lynton), the Walt Disney Company (Robert Iger), and Warner Bros. (Barry Meyer). Negotiators for the striking writers reached a tentative agreement on February 8, 2008, and the ...